MotoGP Silverstone: age is nothing but a number

MotoGP
By Amy Dargan
amylouisedargan  MotoGP's official roving reporter since the beginning of the 2015 season. Previously it was three years getting muddy covering MXGP but this season she'll be filling BikeSocial readers in on the story lines in between the racing lines after each MotoGP.

 

On a sunny Sunday afternoon in Northamptonshire the MotoGP titans delivered a spectacle of exceptional talent, matured race craft and dramatic entertainment.

We couldn’t have asked for more.

As I was driving back home and thinking back on the weekend happenings I started to mull over one subject that had followed me over the weekend. The grand prix started with the news that Thomas Luthi had signed his contract with Marc VDS and that at the age of 30 he was getting his first opportunity in MotoGP. It was funny because I had asked him only a couple races back after he had closed the gap on the Moto2 championship with his victory in Brno whether he still had MotoGP aspirations and he had played down the subject clearly now looking back with a secret smile.

It’s no secret that the manufacturers in recent years have shown a preference to finding younger talent and catapulting them through the ranks. I had also chatted on Sunday with Jonathan Rea about it, having established himself now so well within the World Superbike history books, is MotoGP still in his foresights and whilst he mentioned it would only really be a case of moving if the right opportunity came around, he also added that he was the wrong side of 20.

 

Moto2 racer Thomas Luthi

Tom Luthi with Marc VDS Team Manager, Michael Bartholemy

 

I guess it hadn’t really been something I had questioned before, it had sort of made sense, sure you’re going to go with the younger talented guy because you’ll hopefully be able to develop him quickly and then get more winning years out of him with any luck. It was only really this year when I started working with the Speedway Grand Prix series and 47 year old Greg Hancock was coming in as reigning world champion that age became a more considered topic to me.

So you can imagine my thoughts as the wily ole fox Valentino Rossi who on his 300th premiere class appearance controlled the race at the front so masterfully for all but three laps and then it was none other than Andrea Dovizioso who took over. The man that has had to wait for his tenth season in his MotoGP to lead the world championship and now he’s done it twice in one year not to mention his fourth win of the season out of a career totaling six.

Apparently, it’s a pretty good time to be the other side of thirty…fine wine and all of that! I just wonder whether we would ever see a reversal of the factories preference, perhaps unlikely but if that was to be the case, which riders would you like to see be given an opportunity in MotoGP?

 

OCTO BRITISH GRAND PRIX

Pos.

Points

Num.

Rider

Nation

Team

Bike

Km/h

Time/Gap

1

25

4

Andrea DOVIZIOSO

ITA

Ducati Team

Ducati

173.7

40'45.496

2

20

25

Maverick VIÑALES

SPA

Movistar Yamaha MotoGP

Yamaha

173.6

+0.114

3

16

46

Valentino ROSSI

ITA

Movistar Yamaha MotoGP

Yamaha

173.6

+0.749

4

13

35

Cal CRUTCHLOW

GBR

LCR Honda

Honda

173.5

+1.679

5

11

99

Jorge LORENZO

SPA

Ducati Team

Ducati

173.4

+3.508

6

10

5

Johann ZARCO

FRA

Monster Yamaha Tech 3

Yamaha

173.2

+7.001

7

9

26

Dani PEDROSA

SPA

Repsol Honda Team

Honda

172.9

+10.944

8

8

45

Scott REDDING

GBR

OCTO Pramac Racing

Ducati

172.7

+13.627

9

7

42

Alex RINS

SPA

Team SUZUKI ECSTAR

Suzuki

172.6

+15.661

10

6

19

Alvaro BAUTISTA

SPA

Pull&Bear Aspar Team

Ducati

171.9

+25.279

 

CHAMPIONSHIP STANDING

Pos.

Rider

Bike

Nation

Points

1

Andrea DOVIZIOSO

Ducati

ITA

183

2

Marc MARQUEZ

Honda

SPA

174

3

Maverick VIÑALES

Yamaha

SPA

170

4

Valentino ROSSI

Yamaha

ITA

157

5

Dani PEDROSA

Honda

SPA

148

6

Johann ZARCO

Yamaha

FRA

109

7

Jorge LORENZO

Ducati

SPA

90

8

Cal CRUTCHLOW

Honda

GBR

89

9

Jonas FOLGER

Yamaha

GER

77

10

Danilo PETRUCCI

Ducati

ITA

75

MotoGP repoerter for BikeSocial Amy Dargan

 

Who is Amy? 

Amy is one of MotoGP’s official roving reporters hunting down the riders, their managers, crew chiefs and paddock personalities at every Grand Prix. This season she'll be filling BikeSocial readers in on the story lines in between the racing lines. 

Amy is all about two wheels coming from three years covering the MXGP championship before embarking on her third season in MotoGP, she'll also be the pit lane reporter at selected Speedway Grand Prix this year. 

You can follow her 2017 season on Instagram at @amylouisedargan and Twitter @amylouisedargan

 

 

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