Tested: Segura Stripe leather jacket review

 

Date reviewed: November 2017 | Tested by: John Milbank | Price: £399.99 | www.tranam.co.uk

 

As street bikes take a firmer hold of the motorcycle market, more casual or retro-styled kit is becoming ever more popular. I’ve been using this Segura Retro Brown leather jacket for five months now – on a variety of bikes – typically paired with some aramid-lined motorcycle jeans.

 

Construction

This buffalo hide leather jacket has a wonderful finish, with the surface naturally weathering – it doesn’t look like a ‘forced retro’ jacket, rather a timeless design that will gain its own patina as you wear it.

The back is a large, single piece of leather – instead of two with a vertical seam – something often indicative of a quality construction, as larger, unblemished cuts of leather tend to be more expensive.

The seams are very well finished, and metal YKK zips are used on the cuffs, chest and pockets.

 

 

Protection

The Retro jacket itself is French standard CE-approved for motorcycle use. It also comes with CE-approved shoulder and elbow protectors; it’s a shame there’s no back-protector supplied, though there is a pocket for one.

 

Fit and comfort

Fit will of course be very personal, but I find the arm length, chest and waist size to be perfect for me. The neck seems a little wide, and the cuffs, which fasten with a zip and popper, could be a touch tighter. There are two positions for the wrist poppers, but on the tighter setting they don’t look as neat, and aren’t quite as comfortable. I’ve not had any problems with the Retro interfering with my gloves though, and I find the soft leather jacket very comfortable overall.

 

 

Pockets and lining

A thermal lining is held securely in place with poppers at the cuffs, buttons at the armpits and a zip around the body. I don’t tend to use it, as with no vents or perforations, the Segura tends to be a good temperature for most summer riding in the UK. I’ve worn it in Spain too, and while it does get hotter, there’s enough air moving around that it’s not uncomfortable.

There are one zipped and two Velcro-closed pockets on the inside, along with two at the chest on the outside, and two on the waist. These outer pockets have leather behind the metal zips – a neat attention to detail that helps prevent heat transfer in the event of a slide. There’s also a small pocket at the end of the right sleeve for coins, credit card or a toll ticket.

The lining is a comfortable mesh, though I sometimes felt the Velcro fastening at the elbows when riding – careful positioning of the two flaps can minimise this, and trimming the corners of the Velcro really helps prevent any irritation.

 

 

 

Conclusion

This is a beautifully made jacket. Despite the slightly wide neck, I love wearing it both on and off the bike. The armour’s not too intrusive, so doesn’t look daft if I’m just wearing it to the pub; when I’m riding, I wear a separate Rukka Kastor 2 chest and back protector.

The Retro is one of those pieces of motorcycle kit that I can imagine staying with me for a very long time – as the leather gets its own marks it ages wonderfully, making for a jacket that’ll surely look as good in ten years as it does today.

 

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