Tested Scorpion EXO 2000 EVO Air review

John Milbank, BikeSocial Consumer Editor
By John Milbank
BikingMilbank BikeSocial Consumer Editor, John owns a KTM 1050 Adventure. He's as happy tinkering in the workshop as he is on twisty, bumpy backroads, and loves every bike ever built (except one). He's bought three CBR600s, two Ducati Monsters, several winter hacks, three off-roaders, a supermoto pit bike, a Honda Vision 50 and built his own custom XSR700. 

 

Date reviewed: July 2017 | Tested by: John Milbank | Price: £299 | www.tranam.co.uk/category/exo2000-air-evo

 

I’ve worn this ACU Gold approved lid – built in Scorpion’s Korean factory and with a five-year warranty – on a mixture of sport, street and adventure bikes. Being a race helmet, you expect a snug fit, with a visor aperture designed for good vision when your head is tipped down, but it’s proved versatile on a variety of machines…

 

Outer shell

There are four outer shell sizes used in the manufacture of the EXO 2000 EVO Air – one for extra small, one for small and medium, one for large, and one for extra large and extra extra large. The ‘TCT’ (Thermodynamic Composite Technology) shell combines fibreglass, Kevlar and poly-resin, and the model reviewed is ‘carbon white/red/black’ – it’s carbon-look only, with the overall styling giving it an aggressive, very sporty look.

Finish is good, with a deep lacquer over the graphics and a 3D logo on the brow. The black and white areas of this design have a fine metallic sparkle to them, and only on the small rear exhaust ports is the finish a little rougher, where the paint doesn’t quite run to the edge of the apertures, which also have a slightly rough cut. 

 

 

Scorpion EXO 2000 EVO Air Ventilation_09

 

Weight

Specified as 1350g ± 50g, my medium-sized lid weighs 1385g – which compares to 1629g for an Arai Quantum ST, and 1707g for a flip-front Schuberth C4 touring helmet with intercom. It’s not much heavier than Shark’s carbon-fibre Spartan, at 1332g, making it one of the lighter lids on the market.

 

Ventilation

There are two vents on the top of the lid, each with two stages and closed, an open/closed brow vent and a two stage / closed mouth vent. There are three rear exhaust vents, though the lower two are blanked off by the lining, so serve little purpose. The Scorpion gives good ventilation thanks to deep grooves in the polystyrene inner shell, making it comfortable to wear on hot days.

 

 

Visor

Overall vision is excellent, and while the aperture is shaped to give a good view when your head is tipped down while laying across a sportsbike, when you’re sat upright, the lower section isn’t intrusive, making for a good, clear view on any bike.

The seal works well, preventing water from entering the top of the visor, channelling it down the sides, and a lever on the left allows you to crack the bottom of the visor open slightly for ventilation. Pushed up, the same lever also locks the visor down. This can be overridden by lifting the visor with more force, and I’ve never had a problem with the visor opening itself, whether locked or unlocked.

The visor is retained with a six-position ratchet that operates smoothly from a single thumb tab on the front left of the visor. I’d prefer to see a tab on either side, for use when I’m at the lights and holding the clutch in, but this is a rare addition to any helmet.

The visor change system is extremely quick and simple, with a single lever on each side to release, and the visor clipping directly back into place without and problems; an excellent system.

A Pinlock MaxVision anti-fog visor insert is included, which doesn’t interfere with the view as smaller Pinlocks can.

There’s no drop-down sun visor in the helmet, but a dark smoke visor is included in its own convenient carrier. I prefer using a dark visor to a drop-down, as it means fewer layers of plastic in front of my eyes. While they’re not for road use, as a spectacle wearer, I prefer to ride with a dark visor in the sun, always carrying my clear with me, should the weather change.

Both visors have tear-off mounts.

 

 

Lining

The lining is soft and comfortable, as well as removable, while the cheek pads have clearly labelled and easy to use emergency tabs, making it a safer process for the helmet to be taken off in the event of an accident.

The Scorpion includes a removable nose deflector and chin skirt, reducing fogging and noise/drafts respectively.

 

 

Fastening

The EXO uses an ‘ultralight titanium’ double-D strap. I’ve never noticed the weight of a strap before, and I haven’t here, though it’s very easy to use the buckle, thanks to a rubber-tipped tag and a well-placed popper to keep the end of the strap from flapping.

 

Scorpion EXO 2000 EVO Air D-ring_19_740pxWide

 

Fit

Comfort is very subjective, but I found the Scorpion EXO 2000 EVO Air to be a very snug fit. Putting it on takes a little practice to avoid your ears folding over, but it’s possible to reach in and flip them back. Being snug, the lid doesn’t lift or rotate in use, even at high speed on a naked bike. I did find though that after a full day’s riding, my forehead got sore. This was compounded by sunburn though, and with use the inner shell has relaxed a little, making for a more comfortable fit.

Under the chin skirt is a large red button – accessible with gloves on, it can be used to pump up a small bladder behind the cheek pads, creating a customisable fit that further prevents the helmet from rotating or shaking at speed. When I forget to use it, the Scorpion is still stable and comfortable, but when I do pump it up, it does give an even more secure feel.

Relaxed touring riders may find this too tight a helmet, but for faster riding, and track use, the fit – on my head at least – has proven good.

My glasses slide under the lid, though as always, be sure to try any helmet on before purchasing to check it’s the right shape for you, and that it’s compatible with your design of spectacles.

 

Scorpion EXO 2000 EVO Air In Use_20_740pxWide

 

Noise

I’m yet to find a lid that’s quiet enough to not need earplugs, but the large padded areas around the ears, and the snug fit make this a relatively peaceful place to be. I experienced no unusual howls, though I did occasionally get a slight squeak from the inside; moving the cheek pads – which float slightly, usually cured this.

 

Conclusion

The Scorpion EXO 2000 EVO Air is a very good sports-bike lid that offers excellent value for money. The snug fit might not suit everyone, but besides the pressure on my forehead, I’ve been very happy with this helmet, appreciating its light weight, stylish shape, and included black visor, which saves an additional £50 or more over the competition.

 

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