Honda NC750X (2014-2016): Review & Buying Guide

Phil West
By Phil West
PhilWestNew Former Editor of Bike, ex-Road Test Editor of MCN, ridden more bikes than he can remember. Likes: GTS, Paso, Mantra. Dislikes: own rust bucket LC and 900 T-Bird daily driver.

 

The NC750X is the enlarged, 2014 successor to the original 2011 NC700X. As such it’s the adventure-styled variant of Honda’s ‘NC’ ‘New Concept’ triumvirate of low-revving, semi-automatic, novice-friendly twins (along with the now NC750S roadster and Integra maxi-scooter). Apart from easy, commuter riding and 80+mpg the two motorcycle NCs also come with the unique option of Honda’s clever ‘Dual Clutch Transmission’ (DCT) which provides a scooter-style ‘twist ‘n’ go’ transmission.

The 2014 update not only provides a significant performance boost but the engine also gains a second balancer shaft which, Honda claims, halves mechanical vibration.

As an easy, affordable and economical commuter but with a touch of fashionable adventure style, the NC750X has a lot going for it – which probably explains why it became one of the UK’s top selling bikes that year. And, with durability and reliability good it also makes a tempting used buy – but later versions are better looking and equipped.

 

Honda NC750X (2014-2016): Price

The price of the base, non-DCT NC750X in 2014 was a temptingly affordable £6,299 new with the DCT version £600 more at £6,899. The bike’s popularity and durability mean used prices are strong. Even the cheapest examples available aren’t much under £4,000, even though the model has been updated a number of times since. Its commuter appeal also means some accessories, particularly genuine Honda ones such as a top box, centre stand and heated grips, can also add value. A clean, well-equipped, low mileage late 2015 example can fetch over £4,500 but for that money we’d recommend the later, face-lifted model.

 

The NC750X is the enlarged, 2014 successor to the original 2011 NC700X. As such it’s the adventure-styled variant of Honda’s ‘NC’ ‘New Concept’ triumvirate of low-revving, semi-automatic, novice-friendly twins (along with the now NC750S roadster and Integra maxi-scooter).

 

Power and Torque

The original 2011 NC700X produced just 48bhp which was generally considered a little too much on the ‘soft’ side – hence this 2014 performance boost. The enlarged engine now puts out 54bhp (or 40.3kW in new money) which is 75cc and 6bhp more than the NC700X on which the new one is based.  The power band is low but very smooth with a red-line of 6,500rpm which rather than sneaking up on you giving a gentle warning, attacks you leaving you a little embarrassed should anyone be watching/listening. 

 

Engine, Gearbox and Exhaust

In broad terms, the NC family’s engine is derived from that of a car, specifically being half that of the Honda Jazz, which helps explain it’s unusual, canted forward cylinder block and impressive, low revving mpg figures. It’s a liquid-cooled, four-stroke, eight-valve, SOHC parallel twin which for 2014, thanks to a 4mm larger bore, is now 745cc. It’s also gained a second balancer shaft which, Honda claims, halves the mechanical vibration.

More significant still is its DCT transmission option. Although the X and S are both offered with conventional, six-speed manual gearboxes, DCT gives both a clutch lever-less full automatic option, turning the NC into a more hi-tech, ‘twist ‘n’ go’ scooter-style machine, plus also a semi-automatic option where you go up and down through the gears via two switches on the left bar. Unusual at first, it makes riding the NC easier still and turns it into a half-bike, half-scooter. On the downside the exhaust note, due to the low-revving engine, is a bit car-like, too.

 

The NC750X is the enlarged, 2014 successor to the original 2011 NC700X. As such it’s the adventure-styled variant of Honda’s ‘NC’ ‘New Concept’ triumvirate of low-revving, semi-automatic, novice-friendly twins (along with the now NC750S roadster and Integra maxi-scooter).

 

Honda NC750X (2014-2016): Economy

Although enlarged and more powerful, the new 745cc version of the NC750X’s parallel twin remains as impressively economical as ever. During our first ride it returned over 80mpg enough for a theoretical range of over 250 miles from its 14.1-litre under-seat fuel tank (the ‘tank’ behind the handlebars is a scooter-style storage compartment) and even around town in full DCT mode, well in excess of 60mpg should be easily possible.

 

Handling, suspension, chassis and weight

The engine is not only canted low, it’s also positioned low in the chassis as is the fuel tank, (which is accessed from beneath the pillion seat), and this combination offers a noticeable low centre of gravity which in turn is ideal for low speed manoeuvring, helping make it very novice-friendly. Although the suspension is fairly basic to keep prices low and the forks are non-adjustable, the front and rear units do a good enough job, especially considering the gentle demands likely to be placed on them and the ride is plush. Overall the chassis is adequate rather than inspiring while, being a slim, fairly simply twin means its all-up weight is unintimidating and easily manageable, too, at 218kg, although the DCT option is a not insignificant 10kg heavier.

 

The NC750X is the enlarged, 2014 successor to the original 2011 NC700X. As such it’s the adventure-styled variant of Honda’s ‘NC’ ‘New Concept’ triumvirate of low-revving, semi-automatic, novice-friendly twins (along with the now NC750S roadster and Integra maxi-scooter).

 

Honda NC750X (2014-2016): Brakes

Again, being a budget-orientated commuter, the NC750X has nothing much to shout about in the braking department but they do the job. There are single discs front and rear, linked via a clever three-piston caliper system and all also with linked ABS. There’s no sportsbike style power, admittedly, but are more than sufficient and have a pleasing amount of feel from the lever.

 

Comfort over distance and touring

The high, upright riding position is both good for you to see and equally be seen. The small screen of the X gives some protection from the elements with a taller version available as an optional extra. The seat is broad and more than adequate and there’s a reasonable amount of pillion space. Overall, it’s more commuter/tourer than a full-size adventure machine but it makes a good all-rounder.

 

Rider aids and extra equipment / accessories

DCT option and useful, helmet-sized storage compartment in the fake ‘tank’ aside, the NC750X is a fairly basic, straightforward commuter with no electronic rider aids or modes (ABS aside) and a fairly basic spec. A centre-stand, for example, is an extra-cost accessory. That said, it has all the basics you need. However, if buying used it’s worth considering any accessories that may come with it. A centre-stand, top box, tall screen, heated grips etc are all popular and worthwhile.

 

 

Honda NC750X (2014-2016): verdict

The NC750X combines the benefits of a larger capacity scooter with a geared bike and has proven itself to be a hit with those who own larger adventure bikes who realise that they don’t need an off-road bike when they even avoid puddles. It’s narrow enough to make a fine filtering commuter bike and through all-weather at that. 

If you‘re looking for your first ‘big bike’ or are getting back into it after a long break then it ticks every box as an easy-going, economical, smooth, commuter bike. However, if you’re looking for a larger capacity machine which is easy on the fuel gauge and can store a full-face helmet without the requirement of a top box then you can also add the NC750X to your shortlist. Being a Honda, it does everything well, build quality is excellent and the NC range has a reputation for reliability. It’s also unintimidating, easy and comfortable to ride, very practical and the performance improvements the enlarged engine bring are worth having.

 

Three things we love about the NC…

  • Easy and engaging to ride
  • Impressive economy
  • Tank storage space

 

Three things that we don’t…

  • Though improved, performance underwhelming
  • Drab styling facelifted on 2016 version
  • No centre stand as standard

 

Honda NC750X (2014-2016) - Spec

Original price

£6,299

Used price

From £3,750-£4,750

Capacity

745cc

Bore x Stroke

77x80mm

Engine layout

Parallel twin

Engine details

Liquid-cooled, 4v, SOHC

Power

54hp (40.3kW) @ 6,250rpm

Torque

50lb-ft (68Nm) @ 4,750rpm

Top speed

125mph (est)

Transmission

6 speed/DCT, chain final drive

Average fuel consumption

81mpg

Tank size

14.1litres

Max range to empty (theoretical)

251miles

Reserve capacity

25miles (est)

Rider aids

ABS only

Frame

Steel backbone

Front suspension

41mm telescopic forks

Front suspension adjustment

None

Rear suspension

Monoshock

Rear suspension adjustment

Preload only

Front brake

1 x 320mm disc, three-piston Nissan caliper

Rear brake

240mm disc, single-piston Nissin caliper

Front tyre

120/70 – 17

Rear tyre

160/60 – 17

Rake/Trail

27°/110mm

Dimensions

2210mm x 830mm x 1285mm (LxWxH)

Wheelbase

1540mm

Ground clearance

165mm

Seat height

790mm

Wet weight

218kg (DCT = 228kg)

 

Looking for bike insurance? Get a quote for this motorcycle with Bennetts motorbike insurance

 

Latest News from Bike Social

Latest News

  • Harley-Davidson 3rd quarter results_thumb
    Hero to develop range of Indian Harley-Davidsons
  • 2021 Yamaha MT-09 Price Spec News_thumb
    Official: All-new 2021 Yamaha MT-09
  • Revised post covid MotoGP calendar
    2020 MotoGP Calendar, Championship Table and TV Times
  • Honda developing motorcycle autopilot_thumb
    Honda developing motorcycle autopilot